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Mike Macgirvin

mike@macgirvin.com

Mike Macgirvin
 High Range, Australia 
A young doe in the middle of the freeway, on her knees but alert; surrounded by emergency workers.

I do hope this story ends well.
Marshall Sutherland
  last edited: Tue, 30 May 2017 14:26:27 +1000  
We had a fawn, no more than a week old, wander right up to the house today. Mommy deer kept her distance. I was talking on my phone and didn't think to use it to get a picture.
Mike Macgirvin
 High Range, Australia 
Just finished reading through a thread on GNU-Social where GS developer dismisses 'account migration' completely because to do it right is 'just too complicated'.

We choose to go to the moon. We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one which we intend to win, and the others, too.
-- John F Kennedy
Mike Macgirvin
  
No doubt - there was a lot of fascinating cold war technology. Thought transferrence, anti-gravity research, etc.
Carolus Rex
  
Best line of the speech, delivered in the heat of Houston, TX:
...causing heat about half that of the temperature of the sun--almost as hot as it is here today--and do all this, and do it right, and do it first before this decade is out--then we must be bold.
Sean Tilley
  
Unfortunately, GS developers seem to have some of the most unfortunate attitudes about developing new features for federation or privacy. The general consensus I see is: "It's imperfect, too complicated, and might have corner cases that cause further issues, therefore we won't do anything about it."
Mike Macgirvin
 High Range, Australia 
Kenny Rogers did the most famous cover, but there were dozens of others. Here's the original.



Mickey Newbury -- Just Dropped In (To See What Condition My Condition Was In)
by JudasKFoxglove on YouTube
Carolus Rex
  
Seth Martin
  
There are some people in this part of town that call me the Dude. I'll be walking through a store and someone will yell, "it's the dude!". This song and the Big Lebowski are what comes to mind each time.
Mike Macgirvin
 High Range, Australia 
Stack Overflow: Helping One Million Developers Exit Vim - Stack Overflow Blog

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This morning, a popular Stack Overflow question hit a major milestone:
Mike Macgirvin
 High Range, Australia 
There's a fair bit of DoubleThink here to wade through, and the original statement link is practically devoid of substance but I still encourage folks to try and digest this because it shows how deeply entangled/intertwined the surveillance state has become.

Facebook & Google lobbyists fight latest user privacy bill

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Google and Facebook lobbyists are fighting tooth and nail against the latest proposed law to strengthen privacy online.
Maria Karlsen
  
DoubleThink indeed. :facepalm
Mike Macgirvin
 High Range, Australia 
Here's a nice little addon project if you want to do something fun

https://github.com/webonyx/graphql-php

Which implements

GraphQL: A query language for APIs.

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GraphQL provides a complete description of the data in your API, gives clients the power to ask for exactly what they need and nothing more, makes it easier to evolve APIs over time, and enables powerful developer tools.


We'll ignore the fact that it was developed by Facebook just like we ignore that bootstrap was developed by Twitter. But do check the libraries for back doors. I don't trust those bastards for a millisecond.
Mike Macgirvin
 High Range, Australia 
Tell me the truth. How likely are you to trust the quality control of a condom manufactured in China?

Ansell sheds condom business in $800m deal with China

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The  venerable Ansell condom business has been sold to Chinese interests after almost 80 years in Australian hands.
Adam Robertson
  
I would guess it would depend on the urgency of the moment.
mrjive
  
In China, condoms *have* to work, due to birth control policies. The ones for use *in China*, at least.
Mike Macgirvin
 High Range, Australia 
50 years ago. May 1967 and the beginning of a summer unlike any summer before or since - my great aunt (who lived a few blocks away) drove us to the Haight Ashbury district to "see the hippies". In modern times they would be called 'refugees'. I remember people in strange clothes selling underground newspapers for ten cents each (the Oracle was my favourite of the several I picked up). If you wanted food or books or clothes or musical instruments or bicycles to get around, there was free stuff everywhere.  You either bartered or just asked for it. The streets were jam packed with people; mostly teenage runaways from other parts of the country who had been hassled at home for not getting haircuts or getting pregnant and were looking for an enlightened (non judgemental) new world where they didn't have to justify their beliefs. I knew a few of these. We all had family friends who took in cousins and nieces/nephews from conservative midwest towns. A friend of my dad helped set up a free health clinic for all the immigrants - they got medications supplied from big pharma companies; basically floor sweepings - which were catalogued and dispensed by a registered nurse, completely unregulated, for free. LSD had been completely legal nation wide only months earlier, and in May 67 was only illegal in California and Nevada, so a lot of these refugees brought in stocks they had obtained in other states (or distributed openly at Grateful Dead or Jefferson Airplane concerts). LSD was typically distributed for free. Marijuana (a common weed) was also free. Everything was free as in beer, free as in freedom. Love and sex were open and free of inhibition.
The penultimate keyword here is 'free'.

May you live in interesting times.
Mike Macgirvin
  
In fairness it was also very short lived... By the time school started in the fall, Haight-Ashbury was dead. The only people left were speed-freaks and junkies. Crime was out of control. Shops were all boarded up or gated and most of the original property owners had sold out and moved elsewhere. It remained in that dilapidated state for the next 20 years. Most of the original "hippies" moved to Mendocino or Humboldt or assimilated into the suburbs.
Sean Tilley
  
Having lived in Haight-Ashbury for six months, I can safely say that it is but a hollow shell of its former self. Commercialism has all but converted its original spirit into a sprawling strip mall punctuated by head shops. Many of the hippies are still real, and the LSD is still very good if you know who to ask, but it is largely a historic district trying to squeeze all of the economic value out of a selectively-depicted past.

Interestingly, the Season of the Witch is only mentioned in passing, but is a fundamental part of understanding why the hippies turned into speed freaks.
Mike Macgirvin
  
Agreed, but at the time you could get speed at convenience stores 24/7. The acid supply chain was regularly disrupted by law enforcement and the Dead's tour schedule.
Mike Macgirvin
 High Range, Australia 
RIP Roger Moore (James Bond IV) - whom I just discovered was 3 years older than Sean Connery (James Bond I).
Mike Macgirvin
 High Range, Australia 
I'm so done with postgres. If you're one of those folks that say "oh it's easy, just use standard SQL and don't be such a lazy bugger", you support the damn thing and stop being such a lazy bugger. I recommend Hubzilla drop it. I'm dropping it from red. I have better ways to spend my life than study arcane differences between SQL implementations.
Mario Vavti
  
I actually had the impression that we were in pretty good shape regarding postgres :astonished:
Mike Macgirvin
  
There is no standard SQL. Just like there is no standard English. There are different dialects and wildly different underlying implementations. It is the subtle and arcane differences that you only discover the hard way which bite. When 2.6 goes out basically anybody using postgres will have to dump their DB, re-create the schema, and restore their data. Without anybody with in-depth postgres knowledge reviewing all the pull requests, this could turn out to be a regular exercise over time. Right now, somebody using postgres is going to have lots of weird bugs that folks without postgres won't be able to recreate or track down. Right now, today. This was the source of the missing apps on postgres. 'char' fields on postgres with default '' (empty string) contents aren't stored with an empty string. They are filled with space characters (byte padded) and this can cause issues if you weren't expecting it. There are a few of these in the schema. I can fix this, but it points out the kind of problems that will occur in the future. It isn't that the SQL is different (we used standard SQL supported by both platforms), it's the storage engines and the way they implement that SQL that is different.
Mario Vavti
  last edited: Wed, 17 May 2017 19:58:28 +1000  
I think i'll setup one of my dev hubs to use postgres...

@habeascodice used to have a better insight on postgres. Maybe he can review related pullrequests if he is still around...
JRandal
 
So it's today, is it? Am I getting it right, your birthday today? If so, have a very merry celebration!

#Happy Birthday
Mike Macgirvin
 High Range, Australia 
It's the federated social web. Except it's closed and proprietary and full of surveillance-ware. Not what you had in mind? Well why don't you get off of your gluteus maximus and help us create an alternative?

Home - Thred

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Our vision is to be the most useful, obvious and used app in the world … an essential digital utility. Thred enables the aggregation of all your messaging, mail, commerce, content and services into one simple and intuitive app. We connect your connections like never before. GET STARTED                                       learn more Play With thred you can connect with ...
Mike Macgirvin
 High Range, Australia 
Imagine the irony... in the country where most everything that is animal, mineral, or vegetable is trying to kill you, we have bees that don't sting.  

http://www.sugarbag.net/faq
Haakon Meland Eriksen (Parlementum)
  
That can't be right. Unless... you also have the alligatorspiderjumping bee?
Mike Macgirvin
  
Well there's this:

https://www.gizmodo.com.au/2017/01/the-most-dangerous-animal-in-australia-is-bees/

and I'm reminded that our dogs cornered an eastern brown in the front yard a couple of weeks ago. These are your worst nightmare.
Haakon Meland Eriksen (Parlementum)
  
Aaahh - all is well in the world again. :-) This snake is only considered the world's second-most venomous land snake, so these are really your penultimate nightmare. :-D
Mike Macgirvin
 High Range, Australia 
Celebrating El Día de la Batalla de Puebla; which will arrive in Puebla in about 45 minutes.
Mike Macgirvin
 High Range, Australia 
Sometimes everything will be going along nicely - and suddenly something in the news is there to remind of you of the short and tormented life of Jacques the fish

Bombay Sapphire gin recalled amid high-alcohol scare

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Thousands of bottles of gin containing almost double the volume of alcohol listed on the label are recalled in Canada.
Mike Macgirvin
 High Range, Australia 
Some random thoughts on federation....

1. If federation was simply a matter of two groups of people using the same protocol (essentially a 'language') to communicate, the United States of America would still be part of the British Commonwealth. Language isn't the issue. Different groups of humans have both cultural and idealogical differences and haven't yet learned how to co-exist at a fundamental level - in fact over the last few years increased globalisation has resulted in even more fragmentation and wall building - if not violence and war. Expecting different cultures to co-exist by forcing the same language on everybody was attempted with disastrous results in both the US and Australia.  Expecting them not to carry these cultural and idealogical biases with them into the online world is a bit naive.  

2. I have a new solution to the paradox caused when you try to have both cross-platform federation and nomadic identity. Instead of trying to make nomadic identity look like it works cross-platform, I now think the ideal solution is to simply acknowledge that it doesn't and bake that into the code.

So if you're on one clone and you've got 12 connections and four of them are Diaspora and four of them are GNU-Social, you'll have 12 connections. If you go to another clone, you'll have 4 zot connections. The others will still be in your connection list but will be displayed under a new tab called (something like) "Unreachable from this site". They won't appear as mail recipients or be included in ACL selections. You won't get their posts or comments - even if your primary site that is connected to them is running. In order to make this work I'll have to actually remove code that tries to make it appear that nomadic identity and federation work together - because it doesn't. I tried to provide an "illusion" that it works but that's all it is - an illusion. We need to clearly delineate that it does not work and this is not a flaw of our platform. In order for federation to work, both parties need to make it work. You can't do it alone. Some changes need to happen on one side, some need to happen on the other.  Or it won't work.

3. The same philosophy applies to magic auth. When you create a protected resource using the ACL selector, you will only see connections which can authenticate to your server. You can still add foreign principals to privacy groups but it will have no effect for non-message resources (in the case of Diaspora or ActivityPub connections), and will not have any effect at all for GNU-Social connections. If they want to authenticate to zot resources, they'll have to learn how to authenticate to zot resources - then we'll add them back into the ACLs.

I think that's the only sane way out of this conflict.
Sean Tilley
 
I wish everything would adopt MagicAuth. It seriously fixes a piece of the UX puzzle, and it means that you don't have to federate absolutely everything.
Mike Macgirvin
 High Range, Australia 
{"access_token":"3944cc376002b483632e2310fe7da39475170bf8","expires_in":3600,"token_type":"Bearer","scope":null}

yay
Mike Macgirvin
  
That's an OAuth2/OpenIDConnect server (running under zot) providing an access token.
Sean Tilley
  
Wow! :D
Mike Macgirvin
 High Range, Australia 
And nobody is concerned that 300km above the planet's surface the temperature can suddenly jump to 3000 degrees C without any apparent warning or cause?

Alberta skywatchers document rare celestial phenomena — they call it 'Steve'

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Meet Steve. He's tall, colourful and photogenic, and
up until recently, he'd been relatively anonymous.
Tobias
  
geez
Mike Macgirvin
 High Range, Australia 
Now we just need somebody to revive the Pistos fork and we'll have a whole army of zombie social network projects. Folks, many of these old projects were abandoned not because nobody liked them, but because the underlying platforms and architectures had major, major flaws and needed to be ripped apart and re-written basically from scratch (which is exactly what was done - the irreparably flawed architectures were discarded because they were - well "irreparably flawed"). Eventually all the zombie project maintainers and their "users" are going to have to come to terms with that.

Best of luck.
Adam Robertson
  
Interestingly, it was Thomas who persauded me to ditch Friendica and try RedMatrix. I am sad he did not continue with the project, as he was quite the advocate for a long time, and a colorful character...but then again, he offended people on a fairly regular basis. I think he enjoyed doing that.

I am talking like he has passed on. I keep forgetting I could just install that stupid Diaspora add-on and re-connect.
Einer von Vielen
  
@adam , Thomas seems to have an account on Friendika.
Adam Robertson
  
@Einer von Vielen   I thought that was where he was at..but I think I need the Diaspora plugin to access Friendica users?
Mike Macgirvin
 High Range, Australia 
Full client-side E2EE is now provided in red as a core functionality, though there's still a shortage of client-side scripts to do the actual encryption/decryption and submit the posts/mail; but that's all moving forward and will come in due course. This should eventually find its way to hubzilla and silence some of the privacy luddites. It's kind of like the built-in (JS) E2EE except that in this case Hubzilla isn't involved at all in the crypto - that's completely up to you. You'll just get a button to download the post/mail and what you do with it from there and whether you can decrypt it or not  is up to you and the other conversants. red/hubzilla would only be protecting the post and its associated meta-data in transit; which gives it a slight leg up on PGP/GPG over ESMTP which leaks metadata (sender/recipients) in plaintext. Haven't looked closely at encrypted XMPP but I highly suspect it also leaks envelope information - it's part of the protocol. In this case the metadata can only be inferred by using statistical traffic analysis of the servers involved in the communication and at best it would only be an educated guess (if both servers held a number of channels). Since you could post these things publicly and only those with matching tools can read them, even that becomes a rabbit hole.

If you can think of a flaw in this scenario (besides hitting the author over the head with a $5 wrench), feel free to bring it up for consideration.